Kangaroo Mother Care Implementation at the Philippine General Hospital: A Quality Assurance Initiative

  • Maria Esterlita T. Villanueva-Uy Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, University of the Philippines Manila
  • Lucille Marie Villanueva-Uy College of Medicine, University of the Philippines Manila, Immaculate Conception Academy, Greenhills, San Juan City
  • Andrea Lauren Tang Chung Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City and Immaculate Conception Academy, Greenhills, San Juan City
  • Socorro De Leon-Mendoza Kangaroo Mother Care Foundation Philippines, Inc.
Keywords: Kangaroo mother care program, implementation, Philippine General Hospital

Abstract

Background. The Philippine General Hospital (PGH) implemented the Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) Program in 2014, recognizing its benefits in helping low birth weight (LBW) infants survive.

Objective. To determine the acceptability and compliance of the stakeholders to the KMC program after one year from implementation.

Method. Data were obtained from the NICU Annual statistics, KMC data forms, logbooks, and questionnaires to the stakeholders-doctors rotating at the NICU, NICU nurses, and mothers enrolled in the KMC program.

Results. One year into the KMC program implementation, the KMC enrollment increased from 57% in 2014 to 75% in 2015. All mothers enrolled in the program said that they received their KMC knowledge from the health providers and firmly believed that KMC benefited them and their infants. The mothers also became more confident in taking care of their babies after each KMC encounter. Although only 50% said they would continue KMC at home, 85% proceeded. Furthermore, both doctors and nurses believed that KMC was beneficial to both mothers and infants, decreased hospital cost and nursing workload. KMC provision was 0.5-6 hours/day. Also, less than half of the data forms were accomplished. The KMC program was acceptable to all stakeholders who believed in the benefits of KMC to preterm infants. The mothers were very receptive and continued KMC even after discharge. However, there was sub-optimal engagement provided by the health providers with the mothers. There was also low adherence to recommended duration of KMC per day provided by the mothers. KMC data records were frequently not accomplished. PGH has instituted strategies to improve the KMC implementation by providing dedicated KMC rooms and supplying meals to mothers to increase KMC duration and frequency. A computer-based program for data entry was developed for the health providers, and a dedicated encoder was assigned.

Conclusion. KMC acceptability was high among stakeholders. Compliance increased after one year, with enrolment going up to 75%. However, adherence to the recommended KMC duration per day and accomplishment of data forms were still sub-optimal.

Author Biographies

Maria Esterlita T. Villanueva-Uy, Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, University of the Philippines Manila

Research Associate Professor 5 - ICHHD, NIH UP Manila

Clinc Asso Professor - Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Philippine Generla Hospital, UP Manila

Board of Trustees - Kangaroo Mother Care Foundation Philippines

Lucille Marie Villanueva-Uy, College of Medicine, University of the Philippines Manila, Immaculate Conception Academy, Greenhills, San Juan City

currently Medical Student - UP College of Medicine

 

was a student at the Immaculate Conception Academy at the time fot he study

Andrea Lauren Tang Chung, Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City and Immaculate Conception Academy, Greenhills, San Juan City

Current student at Ateneo

was a student at the Immaculate Conception Academy at the time fo the study

Socorro De Leon-Mendoza, Kangaroo Mother Care Foundation Philippines, Inc.

President - Kangaroo Mother Care Foundation Philippines

Published
2021-12-21